Honiara Club Agreement

On 19 April and 27 June 1991, an international express shipping agreement was signed in Honiara and Washington, D.C. in Honiara and Washington, D.C, which entered into force on 1 August 1991. [16] On November 6, 1998, a peace agreement was signed in Honiara between the governments of the United States and Solomon Islands. [16] However, since the late 1990s, Honiara has been the center of ethnic violence and political unrest in the country. [17] During the riots, the area around Honiara was the battlefield of rival factions following the rule of the Malays, who were outcasts, and local guadalcanal residents. [9] In June 2000, an attempted coup resulted in violent rebellions and fighting between the Malaita Eagle Force (MEF) and indigenous people from the Isatabu Freedom Movement (IFM). Violence was widespread on the streets of Honiara and, although a peace agreement was reached in October 2000, violence took place in March 2002 when two New Zealand diplomats and many others were murdered. [17] Conditions in Honiara became so bad that in July 2003, Australian military and police units moved to quell the conflict, bolster security, rebuild the damaged city, and protect its destroyed economic, political, and legal institutions. [17] Yachting is popular in Honiara and includes the Point Cruz Yacht Club in the harbor.

[69] The Honiara Golf Club is located on the east side of the city, not far from Lunga River, near King George VI High School (between Honiara and the airport) was originally a nine-hole course on a flat course that was once an airstrip. In the late 1960s, an 11-hole golf course was built with 18 reductions. [69] [70] [71] Boxing, rugby, athletics, basketball, netball and volleyball are also practiced. [65] Netball leagues are organized in Honiara for girls and are well organized in the surrounding large villages, usually by women`s clubs. [72] Although a peace agreement was reached in October 2000, violence took place on the streets of the city in March 2002, when two New Zealand diplomats and many others were murdered. By July 2003, conditions in Honiara had become so bad that the Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI), made up of several Australian-led Pacific nations, was invited to the country by the Solomon Islands government to restore order. . . .